Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball

Vince Guaraldi Greensleeves (A Charlie Brown Christmas: Original Soundtrack Recording of the CBS Television Special)

Dwight Frye in Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale) Set design by Herman Rosse & Charles D. Hall (via)

Dwight Frye in Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale) Set design by Herman Rosse & Charles D. Hall (via)

Otis Redding White Christmas

Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (1961, dir. John Huston) (via)
Photo by Eve Arnold.

Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Misfits (1961, dir. John Huston) (via)

Photo by Eve Arnold.

Julie LondonI’d Like You For Christmas

”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 
I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.
Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”
-Marcello Mastroianni (NY Times interview, Sept. 1987) (photo via)

”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 

I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.

Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”

-Marcello Mastroianni (NY Times interview, Sept. 1987) (photo via)

Duke Ellington Orchestra - Jingle Bells

Federico Fellini directs Marcello Mastroianni & Bernice Stegers on the set of City of Women (1979) (via)

Marlene Dietrich - Der Trommelmann (The Little Drummer Boy)

Marlene Dietrich in Angel (1937, dir. Ernst Lubitsch) (via)

Marlene Dietrich in Angel (1937, dir. Ernst Lubitsch) (via)

Dean Martin - Silver Bells

Pascal Lamorisse in The Red Balloon (1956, dir. Albert Lamorisse) (via)

Pascal Lamorisse in The Red Balloon (1956, dir. Albert Lamorisse) (via)

Edith Piaf - Le Noël de la Rue (The Street’s Christmas) English translation here.

The undersea ‘Realm of Glass’ set from The Thief of Bagdad (1924, dir. Raoul Walsh) Art direction by William Cameron Menzies.
To prepare the set for the underwater world, a family of artisans spent three months hand-blowing the required glass pieces.
(via)

The undersea ‘Realm of Glass’ set from The Thief of Bagdad (1924, dir. Raoul Walsh) Art direction by William Cameron Menzies.

To prepare the set for the underwater world, a family of artisans spent three months hand-blowing the required glass pieces.

(via)

Ella FitzgeraldSleigh Ride