The Fall of the House of Usher (1928, dir. James Sibley Watson) (online here)
“I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary  tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the  evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know  not how it was - but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of  insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the  feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic,  sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest  natural images of the desolate or terrible.
I looked upon the scene before me with an utter depression of soul.  There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart - an  unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination  could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it - I paused to think  - what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of  Usher?”
-Edgar Allan Poe, The Fall of the House of Usher

The Fall of the House of Usher (1928, dir. James Sibley Watson) (online here)

“I had been passing alone, on horseback, through a singularly dreary tract of country; and at length found myself, as the shades of the evening drew on, within view of the melancholy House of Usher. I know not how it was - but, with the first glimpse of the building, a sense of insufferable gloom pervaded my spirit. I say insufferable; for the feeling was unrelieved by any of that half-pleasurable, because poetic, sentiment, with which the mind usually receives even the sternest natural images of the desolate or terrible.

I looked upon the scene before me with an utter depression of soul. There was an iciness, a sinking, a sickening of the heart - an unredeemed dreariness of thought which no goading of the imagination could torture into aught of the sublime. What was it - I paused to think - what was it that so unnerved me in the contemplation of the House of Usher?”

-Edgar Allan Poe, The Fall of the House of Usher