"Art essentially has nothing to do with morality, convention or moralizing. I find the public passion for justice quite boring and artificial, for neither life nor nature care if justice is ever done or not. I myself have a criminal bent. I have a lurking liking for those who flout the law, which I realize is despicable of me."
-Patricia Highsmith, an American writer who is primarily known for her psychological crime thrillers. Her work has been adapted for the screen numerous times, most famously by Alfred Hitchcock with Strangers on a Train and by René Clément with Purple Noon (an adaptation of Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley).
Highsmith was disappointed by how these adaptations softened her work, calling the changes (made to ensure “good triumphs over evil” happy endings), “terrible concessions to so-called public morality.”

"Art essentially has nothing to do with morality, convention or moralizing. I find the public passion for justice quite boring and artificial, for neither life nor nature care if justice is ever done or not. I myself have a criminal bent. I have a lurking liking for those who flout the law, which I realize is despicable of me."

-Patricia Highsmith, an American writer who is primarily known for her psychological crime thrillers. Her work has been adapted for the screen numerous times, most famously by Alfred Hitchcock with Strangers on a Train and by René Clément with Purple Noon (an adaptation of Highsmith’s The Talented Mr. Ripley).

Highsmith was disappointed by how these adaptations softened her work, calling the changes (made to ensure “good triumphs over evil” happy endings), “terrible concessions to so-called public morality.”