Catherine Hessling in publicity still for Nana (1926, dir. Jean Renoir) (via)
“She is a girl descended from four or five generations of drunkards,  her blood tainted by an accumulated inheritance of poverty and drink,  which in her case had taken the form of a nervous derangement of the  sexual instinct. She had grown up in the slums, in the gutters of Paris;  and now, tall and beautiful, and as well made as a plant nurtured on a  dungheap, she was avenging the paupers and outcasts of whom she was the  product.
With her, the rottenness that was allowed to ferment among the lower classes was rising to the surface and rotting the aristocracy. She had become a force of nature, a ferment of destruction,  unwittingly corrupting and disorganizing Paris between her snow-white  thighs.”
-Emile Zola, Nana (1880)

Catherine Hessling in publicity still for Nana (1926, dir. Jean Renoir) (via)

“She is a girl descended from four or five generations of drunkards, her blood tainted by an accumulated inheritance of poverty and drink, which in her case had taken the form of a nervous derangement of the sexual instinct. She had grown up in the slums, in the gutters of Paris; and now, tall and beautiful, and as well made as a plant nurtured on a dungheap, she was avenging the paupers and outcasts of whom she was the product.

With her, the rottenness that was allowed to ferment among the lower classes was rising to the surface and rotting the aristocracy. She had become a force of nature, a ferment of destruction, unwittingly corrupting and disorganizing Paris between her snow-white thighs.”

-Emile Zola, Nana (1880)