Rashomon (1950,  dir. Akira Kurosawa)
“[The three  assistant directors on Rashomon] found the script  baffling and wanted me to explain it to  them. ‘Please read it again  more carefully,’ I told them. ‘If you read  it diligently, you should be  able to understand it because it was  written with the intention of  being comprehensible.’  But they wouldn’t  leave. ‘We believe we have  read it carefully, and we still don’t  understand it at all; that’s why  we want you to explain it to us.’  For  their persistence I gave them  this simple explanation: ‘Human  beings are unable to be honest  with themselves about themselves. They  cannot talk about themselves  without embellishing. This script portrays  such human beings–the kind  who cannot survive without lies to make them  feel they are better  people than they really are. It even shows this  sinful need for  flattering falsehood going beyond the grave—even the  character who dies  cannot give up his lies when he speaks to the living  through a medium.  Egoism is a sin the human being carries with him from  birth; it is the  most difficult to redeem. This film is like a strange  picture scroll  that is unrolled and displayed by the ego. You say that  you can’t  understand this script at all, but that is because the human  heart  itself is impossible to understand. If you focus on the  impossibility  of truly understanding human psychology and read the  script one more  time, I think you will grasp the point of it.’”
-Akira Kurosawa, excerpted from Something Like an Autobiography

Rashomon (1950, dir. Akira Kurosawa)

“[The three assistant directors on Rashomon] found the script baffling and wanted me to explain it to them. ‘Please read it again more carefully,’ I told them. ‘If you read it diligently, you should be able to understand it because it was written with the intention of being comprehensible.’ But they wouldn’t leave. ‘We believe we have read it carefully, and we still don’t understand it at all; that’s why we want you to explain it to us.’ For their persistence I gave them this simple explanation:

‘Human beings are unable to be honest with themselves about themselves. They cannot talk about themselves without embellishing. This script portrays such human beings–the kind who cannot survive without lies to make them feel they are better people than they really are. It even shows this sinful need for flattering falsehood going beyond the grave—even the character who dies cannot give up his lies when he speaks to the living through a medium. Egoism is a sin the human being carries with him from birth; it is the most difficult to redeem. This film is like a strange picture scroll that is unrolled and displayed by the ego. You say that you can’t understand this script at all, but that is because the human heart itself is impossible to understand. If you focus on the impossibility of truly understanding human psychology and read the script one more time, I think you will grasp the point of it.’”

-Akira Kurosawa, excerpted from Something Like an Autobiography