Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
"What? I totally dress up like a picnic table and pose with peacocks all the time. This isn’t weird."
(via)

"What? I totally dress up like a picnic table and pose with peacocks all the time. This isn’t weird."

(via)

Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, and some other dapper gentleman (John Howard?) recording The Philadelphia Story for radio (via)

Katharine Hepburn, Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, and some other dapper gentleman (John Howard?) recording The Philadelphia Story for radio (via)

Laurence Olivier & Vivien Leigh (1948, via nytimes)

Laurence Olivier & Vivien Leigh (1948, via nytimes)

Moira Shearer in The Red Shoes (1948, dir. Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)

Moira Shearer in The Red Shoes (1948, dir. Michael Powell & Emeric Pressburger)

Hedy Lamarr & Victor Mature in Samson & Delilah (1949, dir. Cecil B. DeMille)
In her lively 1967 autobiography, Ecstasy and Me: My Life as a Woman, Hedy Lamarr recalls having cocktails at Romanoff’s with a sleazy talent scout (whom she pseudonymously refers to as Sidney), who tries to seduce her by offering her an audience with Cecil B. DeMille, who was in the process of casting Samson and Delilah.
"C.B.’s a genius at those things," Sidney says, "By the time he’s through spreading the money and talent around, every man in the world will want to screw the heroine of that particular biblical drama. It’s a natural; a guy with muscles, a broad with virginity." “Who plays Samson?” Lamarr asked. “They’re thinking of Victor Mature. But who cares? It’s only a body to set you off in the ruins. Muscles and tits sugarcoated with religion. It’s for you.” As repulsed as Lamarr was by Sidney’s vulgar approach to filmmaking, she bit the carrot and met with the director. A few days later, the role was hers.
Later, Lamarr’s agent echoed Sidney’s sentiments, “C.B. is brilliant. When it comes to sex and spectacle, no one can tear down a temple and tear off a piece at one and the same time like he can. When he sells sex, sister, people buy because he wraps it in fancy paper with pink ribbons.”
-Bret Wood, TCM (via)

Hedy Lamarr & Victor Mature in Samson & Delilah (1949, dir. Cecil B. DeMille)

In her lively 1967 autobiography, Ecstasy and Me: My Life as a Woman, Hedy Lamarr recalls having cocktails at Romanoff’s with a sleazy talent scout (whom she pseudonymously refers to as Sidney), who tries to seduce her by offering her an audience with Cecil B. DeMille, who was in the process of casting Samson and Delilah.

"C.B.’s a genius at those things," Sidney says, "By the time he’s through spreading the money and talent around, every man in the world will want to screw the heroine of that particular biblical drama. It’s a natural; a guy with muscles, a broad with virginity."

“Who plays Samson?” Lamarr asked.

“They’re thinking of Victor Mature. But who cares? It’s only a body to set you off in the ruins. Muscles and tits sugarcoated with religion. It’s for you.”

As repulsed as Lamarr was by Sidney’s vulgar approach to filmmaking, she bit the carrot and met with the director. A few days later, the role was hers.

Later, Lamarr’s agent echoed Sidney’s sentiments, “C.B. is brilliant. When it comes to sex and spectacle, no one can tear down a temple and tear off a piece at one and the same time like he can. When he sells sex, sister, people buy because he wraps it in fancy paper with pink ribbons.”

-Bret Wood, TCM (via)

Barbara Stanwyck & Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1946, dir. Billy Wilder, based on the novel by James M. Cain)
I knew then what I had done. I had killed a man. I had killed a man to get a woman. I had put myself in her power, so there was one person in the world that could point a finger at me, and I would have to die. I had done all that for her, and I never wanted to see her again as long as I lived.
That’s all it takes, one drop of fear, to curdle love into hate.
- James M. Cain, Double Indemnity

Barbara Stanwyck & Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity (1946, dir. Billy Wilder, based on the novel by James M. Cain)

I knew then what I had done. I had killed a man. I had killed a man to get a woman. I had put myself in her power, so there was one person in the world that could point a finger at me, and I would have to die. I had done all that for her, and I never wanted to see her again as long as I lived.

That’s all it takes, one drop of fear, to curdle love into hate.

- James M. Cain, Double Indemnity