Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Dick Powell, Lizabeth Scott, and Raymond Burr in Pitfall (1948, dir. André de Toth) (via Alain Silver’s Film Noir)
"Life is a betrayal. And sometimes you betray yourself too, you know. Let’s have the guts to admit it. There isn’t anybody born here lately who didn’t play dirty sometime, somewhere in his life. So why do you hide it? Truth, honesty, that’s my key [to] filmmaking."
-André de Toth, quoted in A Personal Journey through American Movies with Martin Scorsese (1995)

Dick Powell, Lizabeth Scott, and Raymond Burr in Pitfall (1948, dir. André de Toth) (via Alain Silver’s Film Noir)

"Life is a betrayal. And sometimes you betray yourself too, you know. Let’s have the guts to admit it. There isn’t anybody born here lately who didn’t play dirty sometime, somewhere in his life. So why do you hide it? Truth, honesty, that’s my key [to] filmmaking."

-André de Toth, quoted in A Personal Journey through American Movies with Martin Scorsese (1995)

Vincent Price & Roy Roberts in The House of Wax (1953, dir. André de Toth)
“When they wanted a director for [the first major studio 3-D] film, they hired a man who couldn’t see 3-D at all! André de Toth [who only had one eye] was a very good director, but he really was the wrong director for 3-D. 
He’d go to the rushes and say, ‘Why is everybody so excited about this?’ It didn’t mean anything to him. But he made a good picture, a good thriller. He was largely responsible for the success of the picture. The 3-D tricks just happened—there weren’t a lot of them. Later on, they threw everything at everybody.”
-Vincent Price
(via)

Vincent Price & Roy Roberts in The House of Wax (1953, dir. André de Toth)

“When they wanted a director for [the first major studio 3-D] film, they hired a man who couldn’t see 3-D at all! André de Toth [who only had one eye] was a very good director, but he really was the wrong director for 3-D.

He’d go to the rushes and say, ‘Why is everybody so excited about this?’ It didn’t mean anything to him. But he made a good picture, a good thriller. He was largely responsible for the success of the picture. The 3-D tricks just happened—there weren’t a lot of them. Later on, they threw everything at everybody.”

-Vincent Price

(via)