Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Snow White & the Seven Dwarves (1937, dir. David Hand)

Snow White & the Seven Dwarves (1937, dir. David Hand)

Sleeping Beauty (1959, dir. Les Clark, Eric Larson, and Wolfgang Reitherman)

Sleeping Beauty (1959, dir. Les Clark, Eric Larson, and Wolfgang Reitherman)

Bambi (1942, dir. David Hand)
"All right. I’m corny. But I think there’s just about 140 million people in this country that are just as corny as I am."
-Walt Disney

Bambi (1942, dir. David Hand)

"All right. I’m corny. But I think there’s just about 140 million people in this country that are just as corny as I am."

-Walt Disney

"Art was always a means to an end with me. You get an idea, and you just can’t wait. Once you’ve started, then you’re in there with the punches flying. There’s plenty of trouble, but you can handle it. You can’t back out. It gets you down once in a while, but it’s exciting. Our whole business is exciting."
-Walt Disney (photo by Edward Steichen, via)

"Art was always a means to an end with me. You get an idea, and you just can’t wait. Once you’ve started, then you’re in there with the punches flying. There’s plenty of trouble, but you can handle it. You can’t back out. It gets you down once in a while, but it’s exciting. Our whole business is exciting."

-Walt Disney (photo by Edward Steichen, via)

via Cinderella (1950, dir. Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske)
"Fantasy, if it’s really convincing, can’t become dated, for the simple reason that it represents a flight into a dimension that lies beyond the reach of time. In this new dimension, whatever it is, nothing corrodes or gets run down at the heel or gets to look ridiculous like, say, the celluloid collar or the bustle."
-Walt Disney

via Cinderella (1950, dir. Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, Hamilton Luske)

"Fantasy, if it’s really convincing, can’t become dated, for the simple reason that it represents a flight into a dimension that lies beyond the reach of time. In this new dimension, whatever it is, nothing corrodes or gets run down at the heel or gets to look ridiculous like, say, the celluloid collar or the bustle."

-Walt Disney

Stills via How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966, dir. Chuck Jones)
"Every Who down in Whoville liked Christmas a lot, But the Grinch, who lived just north of Whoville, did not. The Grinch hated Christmas — the whole Christmas season. Oh, please don’t ask why, no one quite knows the reason. It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight. It could be that his head wasn’t screwed on just right. But I think that the best reason of all May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.”

Stills via How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966, dir. Chuck Jones)

"Every Who down in Whoville liked Christmas a lot,
But the Grinch, who lived just north of Whoville, did not.
The Grinch hated Christmas — the whole Christmas season.
Oh, please don’t ask why, no one quite knows the reason.
It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight.
It could be that his head wasn’t screwed on just right.
But I think that the best reason of all
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.”

via the Beethoven sequence from A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez), which can be seen here.
"The centerpiece of the film from a visual standpoint is the scene where Schroeder plays Beethoven’s sonata Pathetique. We are treated to an extraordinary visual collage which borders on the psychedelic, a collage which aptly suggests how music might really come alive inside the creative mind.
The swirling colors, quick glimpses of real locations and personalities, and heady rhythmic editing all make for a rather breathtaking sequence, reminding one that, although largely forgotten now, A Boy Named Charlie Brown was considered a popular “head film” of its day. This sequence alone certainly suggests that the film might have been enjoyed by anyone of a certain higher mind, along with films such as Yellow Submarine.” (via)

via the Beethoven sequence from A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez), which can be seen here.

"The centerpiece of the film from a visual standpoint is the scene where Schroeder plays Beethoven’s sonata Pathetique. We are treated to an extraordinary visual collage which borders on the psychedelic, a collage which aptly suggests how music might really come alive inside the creative mind.

The swirling colors, quick glimpses of real locations and personalities, and heady rhythmic editing all make for a rather breathtaking sequence, reminding one that, although largely forgotten now, A Boy Named Charlie Brown was considered a popular “head film” of its day. This sequence alone certainly suggests that the film might have been enjoyed by anyone of a certain higher mind, along with films such as Yellow Submarine.” (via)

Bambi Meets Godzilla is the title of a humorous 1969  cartoon  created entirely by Marv Newland. Less than two minutes long, the  film is regarded as a classic of animation, and in 1994 was voted #38 of  the 50 Greatest Cartoons of all time by members of the animation field (via)
The cartoon can be seen online here.

Bambi Meets Godzilla is the title of a humorous 1969 cartoon created entirely by Marv Newland. Less than two minutes long, the film is regarded as a classic of animation, and in 1994 was voted #38 of the 50 Greatest Cartoons of all time by members of the animation field (via)

The cartoon can be seen online here.

A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez)
"Sometimes I lie awake at night and I ask: ‘Why me?’ Then a voice answers: ‘Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.’"

A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez)

"Sometimes I lie awake at night and I ask: ‘Why me?’ Then a voice answers: ‘Nothing personal, your name just happened to come up.’"

A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez)

A Boy Named Charlie Brown (1969, dir. Bill Melendez)