Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
The Golem (1920, dir. Carl Boese & Paul Wegener) 
In the film, a rabbi creates a Golem, a clay figure brought to life by magic, to defend the Jews of 16th-century Prague from anti-Semitic attacks. But when the Golem is misused for an act of personal revenge, he transforms into a raging monster who turns on his creators and, in the scene pictured above, sets fire to the Jewish ghetto.
Full film online here.
(via) 

The Golem (1920, dir. Carl Boese & Paul Wegener) 

In the film, a rabbi creates a Golem, a clay figure brought to life by magic, to defend the Jews of 16th-century Prague from anti-Semitic attacks. But when the Golem is misused for an act of personal revenge, he transforms into a raging monster who turns on his creators and, in the scene pictured above, sets fire to the Jewish ghetto.

Full film online here.

(via

Eugen Klöpfer & the watching street in Die Straße (1923, dir. Karl Grune)

Eugen Klöpfer & the watching street in Die Straße (1923, dir. Karl Grune)

Brigitte Helm & Rudolf Klein-Rogge in Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) (photo by Horst von Harbou)

Brigitte Helm & Rudolf Klein-Rogge in Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) (photo by Horst von Harbou)

The Student of Prague (1926, dir. Henrik Galeen)
All sins cast long shadows.

The Student of Prague (1926, dir. Henrik Galeen)

All sins cast long shadows.

Werner Fuetterer as the Archangel in Faust (1926, dir. F. W. Murnau) 
"I think Murnau’s imperturbable calm in the studio was due not only to a sense of discipline, but also because he possessed that passion for ‘play’ itself which is necessary and essential to any kind of artistic activity. 
For instance, I’d made a steam apparatus for the heaven scene in the Prologue to Faust. Steam was ejected out of several pipes against a background of clouds; arc-lights arranged in a circle lit up the steam to look like rays of light. The archangel was supposed to stand in front and raise his flaming sword. We did it several times, and each time it was perfectly all right, but Murnau was so caught up in the pleasure of doing it that he forgot all about time. The steam had to keep on billowing through the beams of light until the archangel — Werner Fuetterer — was so exhausted he could no longer lift his sword. When Murnau realized what had happened, he shook his head and laughed at himself, then gave everyone a break.”
-Faust art director Robert Herlth, quoted in Lotte Eisner’s Murnau. The scene Herlth is discussing is online here.

Werner Fuetterer as the Archangel in Faust (1926, dir. F. W. Murnau) 

"I think Murnau’s imperturbable calm in the studio was due not only to a sense of discipline, but also because he possessed that passion for ‘play’ itself which is necessary and essential to any kind of artistic activity.

For instance, I’d made a steam apparatus for the heaven scene in the Prologue to Faust. Steam was ejected out of several pipes against a background of clouds; arc-lights arranged in a circle lit up the steam to look like rays of light. The archangel was supposed to stand in front and raise his flaming sword. We did it several times, and each time it was perfectly all right, but Murnau was so caught up in the pleasure of doing it that he forgot all about time. The steam had to keep on billowing through the beams of light until the archangel — Werner Fuetterer — was so exhausted he could no longer lift his sword. When Murnau realized what had happened, he shook his head and laughed at himself, then gave everyone a break.”

-Faust art director Robert Herlth, quoted in Lotte Eisner’s Murnau. The scene Herlth is discussing is online here.

Gustav Fröhlich in Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) (via)
Photo by Horst von Harbou.

Gustav Fröhlich in Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) (via)

Photo by Horst von Harbou.

 Lil Dagover in The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari (1920, dir. Robert Wiene) (via)

 Lil Dagover in The Cabinet Of Dr. Caligari (1920, dir. Robert Wiene) (via)

Lil Dagover, Walter Janssen, & Bernhard Goetzke as Death in Destiny (1921, dir. Fritz Lang) (via)

Lil Dagover, Walter Janssen, & Bernhard Goetzke as Death in Destiny (1921, dir. Fritz Lang) (via)

Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) Photo by Horst von Harbou. (via)
Filmed using the Schüfftan Process, a precursor of the bluescreen. The technique used mirrors to create the illusion of live actors in huge sets (which in actuality were miniatures of scenery composed of painted or modeled backgrounds).

Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) Photo by Horst von Harbou. (via)

Filmed using the Schüfftan Process, precursor of the bluescreen. The technique used mirrors to create the illusion of live actors in huge sets (which in actuality were miniatures of scenery composed of painted or modeled backgrounds).

M (1931, dir. Fritz Lang)
(via)

M (1931, dir. Fritz Lang)

(via)

The Love of Jeanne Ney (1927, dir. G.W. Pabst)

The Love of Jeanne Ney (1927, dir. G.W. Pabst)

Conrad Veidt & Lil Dagover in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920, dir. Robert Wiene)
"The scenes in the steep, dark, crooked alleyways belonged to him. Even when he was not in front of the camera, he would prowl around the studio and startle us."
-Lil Dagover on Veidt
(via)

Conrad Veidt & Lil Dagover in The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920, dir. Robert Wiene)

"The scenes in the steep, dark, crooked alleyways belonged to him. Even when he was not in front of the camera, he would prowl around the studio and startle us."

-Lil Dagover on Veidt

(via)

Rudolf Klein-Rogge in production still from Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) Photo by Horst von Harbou.
(via)

Rudolf Klein-Rogge in production still from Metropolis (1927, Fritz Lang) Photo by Horst von Harbou.

(via)

The Student of Prague (1926, dir. Henrik Galeen)

The Student of Prague (1926, dir. Henrik Galeen)