Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball

Great Marketing 101: Part 1

”The fabulous Mr. Alfred Hitchcock is about to escort you on a tour of the location of his new motion picture, Psycho.”

And so begins the delightful original 1960 trailer for Psycho, which features Hitchcock himself offering a guided tour of the Bates Motel murder scene and Bates residence. The trailer was one of the most effective aspects of the ingenious publicity campaign that accompanied the release of Psycho.

In the trailer, Hitchcock plays up his mischievous persona, teases the audience with hints about the movie, shows us the bathroom where the first murder takes place, and lingers over the toilet (much to the shock & irritation of Hollywood censors, as depicting a toilet onscreen was a major taboo in 1960), all building up to the surprise ending.

Great Marketing 101: Part 2 - original trailer for The Birds (1963, dir. Alfred Hitchcock)

"Mr. Hitchcock would like to say a few words to you."

"The body of a rotund man floating along the Thames looked familiar, the face and the portly figure recognisable from the movies.
But nothing nasty had happened to Alfred Hitchcock. The East End-born son of a London greengrocer was merely exercising his macabre sense of humour and marketing skills.
The director was announcing his return home to make Frenzy, a typically gruesome thriller and the first film he’d made entirely in his home country for more than 20 years.
Floating a lifelike dummy of himself on the river was the type of gimmick, mischievous and macabre, that he loved. In a business where those in front of the cameras expect to be the stars, Hitchcock proved bigger than his movies.”
(via)

"The body of a rotund man floating along the Thames looked familiar, the face and the portly figure recognisable from the movies.

But nothing nasty had happened to Alfred Hitchcock. The East End-born son of a London greengrocer was merely exercising his macabre sense of humour and marketing skills.

The director was announcing his return home to make Frenzy, a typically gruesome thriller and the first film he’d made entirely in his home country for more than 20 years.

Floating a lifelike dummy of himself on the river was the type of gimmick, mischievous and macabre, that he loved. In a business where those in front of the cameras expect to be the stars, Hitchcock proved bigger than his movies.”

(via)