Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Humphrey Bogart &  Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges (London 1951, via popperfoto)
“That woman is sensational. I’ll tell you frankly, she used to  irritate the bejeepers out of me with all that ‘mahvelous’ talk. But  when I got to know her I found out she’s one helluva dame.”
-Bogart on Hepburn

Humphrey Bogart & Katharine Hepburn at a press reception at Claridges (London 1951, via popperfoto)

“That woman is sensational. I’ll tell you frankly, she used to irritate the bejeepers out of me with all that ‘mahvelous’ talk. But when I got to know her I found out she’s one helluva dame.”

-Bogart on Hepburn

Humphrey Bogart in publicity still for Dead Reckoning (1947, dir. John Cromwell)
"Bogart did drink. ‘I think the whole world is three drinks  behind,’ he used to say, ‘and it’s high time it caught up.’ On one  occasion he and a friend bought two enormous stuffed panda bears and took them as their dates to El Morocco. They sat them in chairs at a table for four and when an  ambitious young lady came over and touched Bogart’s bear, he shoved her  away. ‘I’m a happily married man,’ he said, ‘and don’t touch my panda.’
The woman brought assault charges against him, and when asked if he was  drunk at four o’clock in the morning, he replied, ‘Sure, isn’t  everybody?’ (The judge ruled that since the panda was Bogart’s personal  property, he could defend it.)”
-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It
In a 1949 LA Times article about Pandagate, Bogart defended his drunken misbehavior on constitutional grounds: “So we get stiff once in a while. So we have a little fun. What’s wrong with that? This is a free country, isn’t it? I can take my panda any place I want to. And if I wanna buy it a drink, that’s my business.”
(TIME magazine’s original 1949 article about the incident can be read here)

Humphrey Bogart in publicity still for Dead Reckoning (1947, dir. John Cromwell)

"Bogart did drink. ‘I think the whole world is three drinks behind,’ he used to say, ‘and it’s high time it caught up.’ On one occasion he and a friend bought two enormous stuffed panda bears and took them as their dates to El Morocco. They sat them in chairs at a table for four and when an ambitious young lady came over and touched Bogart’s bear, he shoved her away. ‘I’m a happily married man,’ he said, ‘and don’t touch my panda.’

The woman brought assault charges against him, and when asked if he was drunk at four o’clock in the morning, he replied, ‘Sure, isn’t everybody?’ (The judge ruled that since the panda was Bogart’s personal property, he could defend it.)”

-excerpted from Peter Bogdanovich’s Who the Hell’s In It

In a 1949 LA Times article about Pandagate, Bogart defended his drunken misbehavior on constitutional grounds: “So we get stiff once in a while. So we have a little fun. What’s wrong with that? This is a free country, isn’t it? I can take my panda any place I want to. And if I wanna buy it a drink, that’s my business.”

(TIME magazine’s original 1949 article about the incident can be read here)

Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not (1944, dir. Howard Hawks) (via)
Q. How did the Bacall character in To Have and Have Not develop?
Howard Hawks: We discovered that she was a little girl who,  when she became insolent, became rather attractive. That was the only  way you noticed her, because she could do it with a grin. So I said to  Bogey, “We are going to try an interesting thing. You are about the most  insolent man on the screen and I’m going to make a girl a little more  insolent than you are.”
“Well,” he said, “you’re going to have a fat time doing that.” And  I said, “No, I’ve got a great advantage because I’m the director. I’ll  tell you just one thing: she’s going to walk out on you in every scene.”  So as every scene ended, she walked out on him. It was a sex  antagonism, that’s what it was, and it made the scenes easy.
-excerpted from Howard Hawks: Interviews

Humphrey Bogart & Lauren Bacall in To Have and Have Not (1944, dir. Howard Hawks) (via)

Q. How did the Bacall character in To Have and Have Not develop?

Howard Hawks: We discovered that she was a little girl who, when she became insolent, became rather attractive. That was the only way you noticed her, because she could do it with a grin. So I said to Bogey, “We are going to try an interesting thing. You are about the most insolent man on the screen and I’m going to make a girl a little more insolent than you are.”

“Well,” he said, “you’re going to have a fat time doing that.” And I said, “No, I’ve got a great advantage because I’m the director. I’ll tell you just one thing: she’s going to walk out on you in every scene.” So as every scene ended, she walked out on him. It was a sex antagonism, that’s what it was, and it made the scenes easy.

-excerpted from Howard Hawks: Interviews

William Wyler, Humphrey Bogart, & Claire Trevor on the set of Dead End (1937, dir. William Wyler)
"What we remember is the gangster, the man who in a sentimental moment returns to the old home. He wants to see his mother and his girl: sentiment is mixed with pride -he’s travelled places; he shows his shirtsleeve - ‘Look - silk, twenty bucks.’ And in two memorable scenes sentimentality turns savage in him. His mother slaps his face (‘just stay away and leave us alone and die’), his girl is diseased and on the streets.
This is the finest performance Bogart has ever given - the ruthless sentimentalist who has melodramatized himself from the start up against the truth, and the fine flexible direction supplies a background of beetle-ridden staircases and mud and mist.”
-Graham Greene, Night and Day (1937)

William Wyler, Humphrey Bogart, & Claire Trevor on the set of Dead End (1937, dir. William Wyler)

"What we remember is the gangster, the man who in a sentimental moment returns to the old home. He wants to see his mother and his girl: sentiment is mixed with pride -he’s travelled places; he shows his shirtsleeve - ‘Look - silk, twenty bucks.’ And in two memorable scenes sentimentality turns savage in him. His mother slaps his face (‘just stay away and leave us alone and die’), his girl is diseased and on the streets.

This is the finest performance Bogart has ever given - the ruthless sentimentalist who has melodramatized himself from the start up against the truth, and the fine flexible direction supplies a background of beetle-ridden staircases and mud and mist.”

-Graham Greene, Night and Day (1937)

Bogie & Bacall with the B17 “Hell’s Angels” of the 303rd Bombardment Group during the war bond tour (1944) (via)

Bogie & Bacall with the B17 “Hell’s Angels” of the 303rd Bombardment Group during the war bond tour (1944) (via)