Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale)

Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale)

Boris Karloff relaxes on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (via)
"The monster was the best friend I ever had. Certainly I was typed. But what is typing? It’s a trademark, a means by which the public recognizes you. Actors work all their lives to achieve that. I got mine with just one picture. It was a blessing."

Boris Karloff relaxes on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (via)

"The monster was the best friend I ever had. Certainly I was typed. But what is typing? It’s a trademark, a means by which the public recognizes you. Actors work all their lives to achieve that. I got mine with just one picture. It was a blessing."

Elsa Lanchester on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (photo by Universal Studios/Getty Images)
“The swans in Regents Park in London inspired me in my performance. They’re really very nasty creatures, always hissing at you. So I used the memory of that hiss. The soundmen ran some of my hisses and screams backwards to add to the strangeness. I spent so much time screaming that I lost my voice and couldn’t speak for days.”

Elsa Lanchester on the set of Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (photo by Universal Studios/Getty Images)

“The swans in Regents Park in London inspired me in my performance. They’re really very nasty creatures, always hissing at you. So I used the memory of that hiss. The soundmen ran some of my hisses and screams backwards to add to the strangeness. I spent so much time screaming that I lost my voice and couldn’t speak for days.”

 
"I was having lunch and [Frankenstein director] James Whale sent either the first assistant or maybe it was his secretary over to me, and asked me to join him for a cup of coffee after lunch, which I did. He asked me if I would make a test for him tomorrow. ‘What for?’ I asked. ‘For a damned awful monster!’ he said.
Of course, I was delighted, because it meant another job, if I was able to land it. Actually that’s all it meant to me. At the same time I felt rather hurt, because at the time I had on very good straight makeup and my best suit - and he wanted to test me for a monster!” 
-Boris Karloff, on being offered the role of Frankenstein’s monster (via)

"I was having lunch and [Frankenstein director] James Whale sent either the first assistant or maybe it was his secretary over to me, and asked me to join him for a cup of coffee after lunch, which I did. He asked me if I would make a test for him tomorrow. ‘What for?’ I asked. ‘For a damned awful monster!’ he said.

Of course, I was delighted, because it meant another job, if I was able to land it. Actually that’s all it meant to me. At the same time I felt rather hurt, because at the time I had on very good straight makeup and my best suit - and he wanted to test me for a monster!” 

-Boris Karloff, on being offered the role of Frankenstein’s monster (via)

Dr. Frankenstein’s laboratory in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (via)
Set design by Charles D. Hall.

Dr. Frankenstein’s laboratory in The Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale) (via)

Set design by Charles D. Hall.

Elsa Lanchester as the monster’s Bride in Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale)
(via)

Elsa Lanchester as the monster’s Bride in Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale)

(via)

Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale)

Frankenstein (1931, dir. James Whale)

”[Frankenstein director James] Whale and I both saw the character as an innocent one. Within the heavy restrictions of my make-up, I tried to play it that way. This was a pathetic creature who, like us all, had neither the will nor the say in his creation, and certainly did not wish upon itself the hideous image which automatically terrified humans it tried to befriend.
The most heartrending aspect of the creature’s life, for us, was his ultimate desertion by his creator. It was as though man, in his blundering, searching attempts to prove himself, was to find himself deserted by his God.”
-Boris Karloff, 1932
(via)

”[Frankenstein director James] Whale and I both saw the character as an innocent one. Within the heavy restrictions of my make-up, I tried to play it that way. This was a pathetic creature who, like us all, had neither the will nor the say in his creation, and certainly did not wish upon itself the hideous image which automatically terrified humans it tried to befriend.

The most heartrending aspect of the creature’s life, for us, was his ultimate desertion by his creator. It was as though man, in his blundering, searching attempts to prove himself, was to find himself deserted by his God.”

-Boris Karloff, 1932

(via)

Laboratory set from Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale). Art direction by Charles D. Hall
(via)

Laboratory set from Bride of Frankenstein (1935, dir. James Whale). Art direction by Charles D. Hall

(via)