Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Lon Chaney in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923, dir. Wallace Worsley) (via)
"There dwelt within the rocky fastness of the cathedral a creature whom the Parisians of that day knew as the ‘Hunchback of Notre Dame’.
Quasimodo. Deaf, half-blind - shut off from his fellow men by his deformities, the bells were the only voice of his groping soul. To the townspeople he was an inhuman freak, a monstrous joke of Nature - and for their jeers he gave them bitter scorn and hate.”

Lon Chaney in The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1923, dir. Wallace Worsley) (via)

"There dwelt within the rocky fastness of the cathedral a creature whom the Parisians of that day knew as the ‘Hunchback of Notre Dame’.

Quasimodo. Deaf, half-blind - shut off from his fellow men by his deformities, the bells were the only voice of his groping soul. To the townspeople he was an inhuman freak, a monstrous joke of Nature - and for their jeers he gave them bitter scorn and hate.”

Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (online here)
“The history  of Lon Chaney is the history of unrequited loves. He  brings that part of  you out into the open, because you fear that you  are not loved, you  fear that you never will be loved, you fear there is  some part of you  that’s grotesque, that the world will turn away  from.”
-Ray Bradbury, interviewed in the documentary, Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces

Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (online here)

“The history of Lon Chaney is the history of unrequited loves. He brings that part of you out into the open, because you fear that you are not loved, you fear that you never will be loved, you fear there is some part of you that’s grotesque, that the world will turn away from.”

-Ray Bradbury, interviewed in the documentary, Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)
“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”
-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)

“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”

-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Lon Chaney & Barbara Bedford in Mockery (1927, dir. Benjamin Christensen) (via) 

Lon Chaney & Barbara Bedford in Mockery (1927, dir. Benjamin Christensen) (via

Above: Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian)

Below: A production sketch from the film 

(via)

Poster art: Batiste Madalena edition (via)

Up until the 1950s, many movie theaters rejected the mass-produced, lithographed film posters designed and distributed by Hollywood studios in favor of original, hand-painted posters created by local artists. 

During the 1920s, Batiste Madalena was the resident artist at the Eastman Theatre in Rochester, NY., where he designed and hand-painted about eight original posters per week. Madalena, who is considered the greatest poster painter of the period, was given full artistic control, with the only directive from his boss being that the posters had to be clearly visible to passengers on passing trolley cars.

More examples of Madalena’s work here

London After Midnight (1927, dir. Tod Browning) (via)

London After Midnight (1927, dir. Tod Browning) (via)

London After Midnight (1927, dir. Tod Browning) (via)

London After Midnight (1927, dir. Tod Browning) (via)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)
“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”
-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)

“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”

-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

The Unholy Three (1930, dir. Jack Conway) (via)

The Unholy Three (1930, dir. Jack Conway) (via)