Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball
Sophia Loren & Marcello Mastroianni in Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow (1963, dir Vittorio de Sica)

Sophia Loren & Marcello Mastroianni in Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow (1963, dir Vittorio de Sica)

Marcello Mastroianni in Le Notti Bianche (1957, dir. Luchino Visconti)

Marcello Mastroianni in Le Notti Bianche (1957, dir. Luchino Visconti)

On Aging:
”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 
I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.
Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”
-Marcello Mastroianni, 1987 (via)

On Aging:

”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 

I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.

Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”

-Marcello Mastroianni, 1987 (via)

Greta Garbo surrounded by reporters as she arrives in New York (1938, photo via Popperfoto/Getty Images)
Rules for meeting Greta Garbo #2 - Wear nice shoes; try not to be stupid:
 
"In Rome, Audrey Hepburn, informed that Marcello Mastroianni was unexpectedly coming to dinner, exclaimed, ‘Oh no! I’ve dreamed of this for years!’
In New York, a similar dream stirred another star - Greta Garbo.
'They said she was nervous and I had to pretend it was an accidental encounter,'recalls the actor. 'So we go to the East Side, above some antique store, and there are two women sitting with Garbo. I say, 'Oh, Signora Garbo, what a surprise!' She smiles and I smile.
'Then she says, 'What beautiful Italian shoes you have.' They were English, but I only want to make her happy. So I say, 'Yes, Signora, Italian.' Then one of the ladies mentions an old Garbo film, and says: 'How beautiful you were.' With that, Garbo gets up and leaves. We go next to a party at the Actors Studio and someone's shouting: 'Mastroianni! Greta Garbo wants you on the phone! The whole place stops like a stuck film track. Garbo says: 'I'm sorry, Mr. Mastroianni. I admire you very much, but I cannot stand stupid women' - and hangs up.”
-Still Mastroianni, New York Times, September 20th, 1987

Greta Garbo surrounded by reporters as she arrives in New York (1938, photo via Popperfoto/Getty Images)

Rules for meeting Greta Garbo #2 - Wear nice shoes; try not to be stupid:

"In Rome, Audrey Hepburn, informed that Marcello Mastroianni was unexpectedly coming to dinner, exclaimed, ‘Oh no! I’ve dreamed of this for years!’

In New York, a similar dream stirred another star - Greta Garbo.

'They said she was nervous and I had to pretend it was an accidental encounter,'recalls the actor. 'So we go to the East Side, above some antique store, and there are two women sitting with Garbo. I say, 'Oh, Signora Garbo, what a surprise!' She smiles and I smile.

'Then she says, 'What beautiful Italian shoes you have.' They were English, but I only want to make her happy. So I say, 'Yes, Signora, Italian.' Then one of the ladies mentions an old Garbo film, and says: 'How beautiful you were.' With that, Garbo gets up and leaves. We go next to a party at the Actors Studio and someone's shouting: 'Mastroianni! Greta Garbo wants you on the phone! The whole place stops like a stuck film track. Garbo says: 'I'm sorry, Mr. Mastroianni. I admire you very much, but I cannot stand stupid women' - and hangs up.”

-Still MastroianniNew York Times, September 20th, 1987

8 1/2 (1963, dir. Federico Fellini)

8 1/2 (1963, dir. Federico Fellini)

Marcello Mastroianni & Jeanne Moreau in La Notte (1961, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni) (via)

Marcello Mastroianni & Jeanne Moreau in La Notte (1961, dir. Michelangelo Antonioni) (via)

Brigitte Bardot and Marcello Mastroianni on the set of Vie privée (1962, dir. Louis Malle)
Photographer: Raymond Depardon (via)

Brigitte Bardot and Marcello Mastroianni on the set of Vie privée (1962, dir. Louis Malle)

Photographer: Raymond Depardon (via)

Marcello Mastroianni & Anouk Aimée in La Dolce Vita (1960, dir. Federico Fellini) (via)

Marcello Mastroianni & Anouk Aimée in La Dolce Vita (1960, dir. Federico Fellini) (via)

Federico Fellini directs Marcello Mastroianni & Bernice Stegers on the set of City of Women (1979) (via)

”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 
I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.
Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”
-Marcello Mastroianni (NY Times interview, Sept. 1987) (photo via)

”Love affairs, adventures - these become less important and your work takes on greater meaning because it gives you the illusion of still being young. So you have a growing sense of security there - and less in life, where I am increasingly insecure. The public says bravo, but those close to you say, ‘You’re past 60 and you still have the brain of a 10-year-old. How is it possible? How else could it be? The Madonna, when I was born, said, ‘That one, he’s to remain forever a baby and become an actor.’ 

I work overtime with my fantasies and always have. Fellini said that when we got past 60, there’d be less trouble, more peace. Women are beautiful, but they complicate life. At night, you don’t sleep, you talk, you argue, you make love at 5 in the morning, then drag yourself off to the studio - a madhouse! But now, there’s still no peace, it’s even worse.

Sunday morning, at the beach at Ostia, I see these pretty girls in bathing suits and I go crazy. With my fantasies, it’ll never end, even at 100! Women see more clearly - too clearly sometimes, especially for an actor who does everything to make real something which, in reality, does not exist. In the theater, you turn a lie, a fiction, into a truth, an illusion into a reality. That’s one of the reasons I’ve been attracted to actresses. They understand this.”

-Marcello Mastroianni (NY Times interview, Sept. 1987) (photo via)