Old Hollywood
Cinema
1900-1979

Nostalgia is a seductive liar - George Wildman Ball

Carl Davis - Red Death (from Davis’s restoration score for 1925’s The Phantom of the Opera)

Performed by The City Of Prague Philharmonic

Carl Davis - Opening Titles (from Davis’s restoration score for 1925’s The Phantom of the Opera)

Performed by The City Of Prague Philharmonic

"There were two [themes] – one theme which was the Phantom in full vengeance and majesty. There was a really minor key, dramatic, doom laden motif, which was going to be his revenge on mankind for his terrible disfigurement.

Then there was going to be the other side, his need for love, his pleading for love. So there is a lyric theme which we associate through the film with the Phantom. And those are the principal two – the whole score is built out of that.”

-Carl Davis

Previously

Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (online here)
“The history  of Lon Chaney is the history of unrequited loves. He  brings that part of  you out into the open, because you fear that you  are not loved, you  fear that you never will be loved, you fear there is  some part of you  that’s grotesque, that the world will turn away  from.”
-Ray Bradbury, interviewed in the documentary, Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces

Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (online here)

“The history of Lon Chaney is the history of unrequited loves. He brings that part of you out into the open, because you fear that you are not loved, you fear that you never will be loved, you fear there is some part of you that’s grotesque, that the world will turn away from.”

-Ray Bradbury, interviewed in the documentary, Lon Chaney: A Thousand Faces

Claude Rains in The Phantom of the Opera (1943, dir. Arthur Lubin) (via)
"Yes, the ghost was there, around them, behind them, beside them; they felt his presence without seeing him, they heard his breath, close, close, close to them!… They trembled … They thought of running away … They dared not … They dared not make a movement or exchange a word that would have told the ghost that they knew that he was there! … What was going to happen?
This happened.
 'SHE IS SINGING TO-NIGHT TO BRING THE CHANDELIER DOWN!'
With one accord, they raised their eyes to the ceiling and uttered a terrible cry. The chandelier, the immense mass of the chandelier was slipping down, coming toward them, at the call of that fiendish voice. Released from its hook, it plunged from the ceiling and came smashing into the middle of the stalls, amid a thousand shouts of terror.”
-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1910)

Claude Rains in The Phantom of the Opera (1943, dir. Arthur Lubin) (via)

"Yes, the ghost was there, around them, behind them, beside them; they felt his presence without seeing him, they heard his breath, close, close, close to them!… They trembled … They thought of running away … They dared not … They dared not make a movement or exchange a word that would have told the ghost that they knew that he was there! … What was going to happen?

This happened.

 'SHE IS SINGING TO-NIGHT TO BRING THE CHANDELIER DOWN!'

With one accord, they raised their eyes to the ceiling and uttered a terrible cry. The chandelier, the immense mass of the chandelier was slipping down, coming toward them, at the call of that fiendish voice. Released from its hook, it plunged from the ceiling and came smashing into the middle of the stalls, amid a thousand shouts of terror.”

-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1910)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)
“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”
-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)

“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”

-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Carl Davis - Faust Ballet (from Davis’s restoration score for 1925’s The Phantom of the Opera)


The ballerinas roam the catacombs of the Paris Opera in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (scene here)

The ballerinas roam the catacombs of the Paris Opera in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (scene here)

Above: Lon Chaney & Mary Philbin in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian)

Below: A production sketch from the film 

(via)

Edward Ward - Lullaby of the Bells (Phantom of the Opera: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack)

Claude Rains & Susanna Foster in The Phantom of the Opera (1943, dir. Arthur Lubin) (via)

Claude Rains & Susanna Foster in The Phantom of the Opera (1943, dir. Arthur Lubin) (via)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)
“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”
-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)

Lon Chaney in The Phantom of the Opera (1925, dir. Rupert Julian) (via)

“Poor, unhappy Erik! Shall we pity him? Shall we curse him? He asked only to be ‘some one,’ like everybody else. But he was too ugly! And he had to hide his genius or use it to play tricks with, when, with an ordinary face, he would have been one of the most distinguished of mankind! He had a heart that could have held the entire empire of the world; and, in the end, he had to content himself with a cellar. Ah, yes, we must need pity the Opera ghost…”

-Gaston Leroux, The Phantom of the Opera (1911)